The climate clock and global warming index

Two resources to make us more aware of climate change - a countdown clock highlighting the critical time window to reach zero emissions and an up-to-the second assessment of total global carbon dioxide emissions.

Cllr L Pepper

Climate Clock

The Climate Clock is one of the most dynamic climate campaigns in the world today, melding art, science, technology, and grassroots organizing to get the world to #ActInTime.

The project is centred on a simple tool, a clock that counts down the critical time window to reach zero emissions (our "Deadline"), while tracking our progress on key solution pathways ("Lifelines").

By showing us what we need to do by when, the Clock frames our critical mission — a rapid and just transition to a safe climate future — and puts it at the very forefront of our attention.

Since its launch in New York in September 2020, Climate Clocks have sprung up across the world from Chiapas to Kazakhstan, from Korea to Glasgow.

COP26

The COP 26 UN Climate Change Conference, hosted by the UK in partnership with Italy, will take place from 31 October to 12 November 2021 in the Scottish Event Campus (SEC) in Glasgow, UK. A giant clock has been projected onto the Tolbooth steeple in the centre of Glasgow, and will count down on the race to save the environment in sync with a 'climate clock' in New York.


 

Global Warming Index

The Global Warming Index on globalwarmingindex.org shows an up-to-the-second assessment of human-induced global warming since the second half of the 19th century. In the 2015 Paris Agreement countries around the world agreed to work towards keeping global warming below 2 degrees - and ideally at 1.5 degrees - in order to avoid the worst impacts of climate change.

This graph shows how global temperatures have risen over the past 170 years, using attribution scienceto understand the causes of this change and smooth out natural fluctuations

The index also shows an up-to-the second assessment of total global carbon dioxide emissions (CO2). CO2 emissions are the biggest contributor to human-induced climate change.

In the 2015 Paris Agreement countries around the world agreed to work towards achieving 'net zero' carbon dioxide emissions. First and foremost, this means reducing CO2 emissions. In order to meet climate targets, it will also be necessary to remove some CO2 from the atmosphere. This could be done by through biological pathways such as forest restoration, or through technologies such as carbon capture and storage.

The Global Warming Index is run by researchers from the Environmental Change Institute at the University of Oxford.
 

Cllr Louise Pepper

Portfolio holder for Environment and Green Issues and Equalities

Videos